Off-Campus Access: Possible Outage Tonight

We’ve been experiencing intermittent connectivity issues with off-campus access since November 11.

The Libraries’ ITS team has been monitoring the situation, and in order to correct the problem, the system may need to go down for a few minutes tonight. Due to the nature of the work that needs to be done, we don’t know exactly when that downtime might be, if it occurs at all. The outage could occur anytime tonight between 6 pm and midnight.

This will be a very brief outage and you might not notice it at all, but if you do have connectivity issues, this is why. If you encounter difficulties connecting tonight, try again in ten minutes. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Scent-free Campaign in the Dalhousie Libraries

no scents fo blog

The Dalhousie Libraries Health & Wellness Committee  are launching a scent free campaign for the Libraries. The purpose of this campaign is to educate staff and library users about the harmful effects of scented products on individuals with scent sensitivities.

The University supports the many students and employees who report that they are harmed when they are exposed to scents which are present in many scented personal care products. Scents in perfume, cologne, hairspray, aftershave, and even some soap and fabric softeners cause serious illness in people who are sensitive to these chemicals. To provide an environment which supports teaching and learning, Dalhousie asks students, staff, faculty, and visitors to refrain from using such scented products while at the University.

Please note that scent free at Dalhousie is a program, not a policy. The fundamental difference between a program and a policy is that a program is meant to educate people about something whereas a policy must be followed. For example, no smoking is a policy that must be followed and enforced while scent free is a program that educates people about potential illnesses and sensitivities regarding soaps, deodorants, etc. to fellow staff, faculty, and students.

no scents info for blog 2

New posters reminding people to refrain from wearing and using scented products will be posted in the libraries. New educational bookmarks will also be placed in books at the time of checkout at the Service Point in each library.

For more information about the scent free program at Dalhousie and for advice on how to handle scent sensitive situations, check out: http://www.dal.ca/dept/safety/programs-services/occupational-safety/scent-free.html

We appreciate your assistance in keeping the Dalhousie Libraries and Dalhousie, scent free.

 

Extended Hours at the Dal Libraries

Tis the season of midterms, papers, and exams. Fear not, the Dal Libraries are here for you, providing you with longer hours to linger in the library with your favourite study buddy or night owl.

For more information about the Night Owl program at the Killam Library, see here.

Killam Memorial Library

Effective October 26–November 14:

Sundays: 10 a.m.–3 a.m.*
Mondays-Thursdays**: 8 a.m.–3 am.
Fridays: 8 a.m.–midnight
Saturdays: 10 a.m.–midnight

Effective November 15–December 14:

Sundays–Thursdays: 8 a.m.–3 am.
Fridays: 8 a.m.–midnight
Saturdays: 8 a.m.–midnight

*Access to the Killam Library from midnight to 3 a.m. is for Dalhousie and King’s students only. Students must have their student ID with them to get in. Regular library services are not offered during this time, students will have access to the South Learning Commons or the atrium.
**Exception: Remembrance Day, Tuesday, November 11. We will be open from 1–9 p.m. 

MacRae Library

Effective November 17–December 10:

Monday–Friday: 8:30 a.m.–midnight
Saturday: 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
Sunday: 10 a.m.–midnight

Sexton Design & Technology Library

Effective November 28–December 14:

Monday–Friday: 8 a.m.–midnight
Saturday:  10 a.m.–midnight
Sunday: 10 a.m.–midnight

Sir James Dunn Law Library

Effective November 28–December 18:

Monday–Wednesday: 8 a.m.–10:45 p.m.
Thursday: 8 a.m.–10:45 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m.–10:45 p.m.
Saturday: noon–10:45 p.m.
Sunday: noon–10:45 p.m.

W. K. Kellogg Health Sciences Library

Effective October 31–December 13:

Monday–Friday**: 7:30 a.m.*–11 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m.–11 p.m.
Sunday: 11 a.m.–11 p.m.

* Staff available at 8:00
**Exception: Remembrance Day, Tuesday, November 11. We will be open from 10 a.m.–11 p.m. 

 

Remembrance Day Hours at the Dal Libraries

remembrance day hours1

Image source: FreeDigitalPhotos.net “Carpet of Poppies” by Tina Phillips

 

Remembrance Day is the day for all Canadians to recognize the contribution our veterans have made and to honour those who made the ultimate sacrifice on behalf of Canada.

Remembrance Day is always on November 11. The Dal Libraries will be observing holiday hours on Tuesday, November 11.

Killam Memorial Library
1–9 p.m.

MacRae Library
1–10:30 p.m.

Sexton Design & Technology Library
10 a.m.–6 p.m.

W. K. Kellogg Health Sciences Library
10 a.m.–11 p.m.

Sir James Dunn Law Library
9 a.m.–10:45 p.m.

 

 

New eBooks

 

new eBooks

The Dalhousie Libraries recently added a number of new eBooks to our collection, in a wide variety of subject areas, from the scientific, technical, and medical publisher, Springer. New titles include:

Contemporary Slovenian timber architecture for sustainability
Perspectives in business informatics research
Handbook for teacher educators
Contemporary Turkey at a glance
Alternative dispute resolution in administrative proceedings
Diversity in mathematics education
Linking local and global sustainability
The use of risk budgets in portfolio optimization
Digital Darwinism: branding and business models in jeopardy

New Springer ebooks can be found using the “Books and More” search from the Libraries’ homepage, or you can browse Springer ebooks and ejournals here: http://ezproxy.library.dal.ca/login?url=http://link.springer.com/

(Please note that we do not have access to all Springer books and journals; titles or articles displaying a yellow “locked” icon are not available).

 

Open Access and Journal Quality

16x24 oaweek poster 2014

 

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its eighth year, is an opportunity for the academics and researchers to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research. (from the Open Access Week website)

This week, the Dalhousie Libraries will be doing a blog post a day on different topics related to open access, as well as hosting two events. 

One of the concerns that is sometimes raised about open access publishing is the possibility that open access journals are of lesser quality than non-open access journals. Journal quality is not directly tied to publishing business models and non-open access journals quality issues often make their way into public view through sites like Retraction Watch.

Selecting the best journal for an article can require some quick research whether a researcher chooses open or closed forms of publication. There are a number of straightforward checks researchers can perform to assess the quality of an OA journal.

  1. Is the journal in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)? Is the publisher a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA)?
  • Most reputable open access journals will have an entry in DOAJ. Use the DOAJ listing to learn more about the journal.
  • If not the journal doesn’t have a DOAJ entry, consider a different journal.
  1. Does the journal have a website? Do the links work and lead to appropriate content?
  • Check that the website content is credible and of a good quality.
  • Numerous language errors (spelling, vocabulary, syntax) and poor information design can be a sign of dubious journal quality.
  1. Does the journal charge author processing charges (APC)? Does the website design make it easy and straightforward to determine what those fees are? Are the fees reasonable? Is the process for waiving or reducing fees clear?
  • A well-run journal will provide information about charges before you submit and many journals will waive APCs for graduate students.
  1. Are the terms of any copyright transfer or author agreement available to you before submitting an article? Are the terms suitable for your purposes?
  • The terms should be made available to you before you submit your article.
  • Some journals will be open to altering the terms.
  1. Is the journal still active and publishing a reasonable number of articles in a fairly regular pattern?
  • Low article counts may indicate a very new journal or can be a warning sign of poor quality.
  1. Scan the titles and abstracts of the recently published articles. Do the articles fit within the journal’s scope and within the discipline?
  • Out-of-scope articles can suggest editorial problems.
  1. Scan the list of authors. Is there a range of people publishing in the journal?
  • Too many articles by the same person over a couple of issues can be a warning sign.
  1. Download and examine at least one article.
  • Do you have to register to read the article? If so, the journal is not fully open access.
  • Is the article well formatted? Poor design and layout can be a sign of quality control issues.
  • Is the article generally well-written? Does it meet disciplinary norms for structure, depth and currency? Poorly written or otherwise weak articles can be a sign of weak editorial and peer review processes.
  1. Is the editorial board listed? If not, you may want to look elsewhere.
  • Do the board members make sense?
  • If in doubt, spot check to confirm identities and expertise.

10. Is the peer review process clearly explained?

  • A well-run journal will provide a clear explanation of what the peer review process includes and may also have specific formatting requirements to support the review process.

11. Are the editorial guidelines (submission processes, timelines, style guide) available, sensible, and easy to understand?

  • You should be easily request or locate all the supporting information.
  • Missing, confusing, or vague guidelines can be a signal of poor journal management.

This list is based on one produced by Walt Crawford; other similar lists can help in the decision-making process.

The Dalhousie Libraries will be hosting two events for Open Access Week:

Differing Perspectives on Open Access: a panel discussion
Thursday, October 23/4–5:30 p.m.
Room 224, Student Union Building

Open Access at MIT Press: OA in a large university press
Friday, October 24/1 p.m.
Room 2616, Killam Memorial Library

What about Open Access and the Humanities?

16x24 oaweek poster 2014

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its eighth year, is an opportunity for the academics and researchers to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research. (from the Open Access Week website)

This week, the Dalhousie Libraries will be doing a blog post a day on different topics related to open access, as well as hosting two events.

What about Open Access and the Humanities?

Much of the success of the open access movement can be seen in the scientific community which over the course of a decade has established many well-regarded open access publishing ventures such as the Public Library of Science (PLoS).

In contrast, humanists have been hesitant to embrace open access. Part of the hesitation comes from the challenge of author processing charges (APCs). While the science community is more accustomed to scholarly communication process which include page charges, the model of authors paying some portion of publication costs is less common in humanities publishing. As well, unlike scientists, humanists tend to be focussed on publishing sustained arguments in book form rather than articles in journals.

That said, a number of important initiatives are underway in the humanities.

Knowledge Unlatched is a UK initiative that focuses on open access monographs. The Knowledge Unlatched approach shifts the business model away from author processing charges to libraries paying publishers to make books open access. A group of libraries identifies a list of books that they think should be made open access and pool together money to pay the publisher a single, collective fee for each title. The fee is based on what the publisher calculates as a cost of publishing the book. If the libraries agree to the fee, the title is released as an open access PDF free of digital rights management (DRM) with a Creative Commons license. On average, libraries pay $43 per library per book and publishers receive $12,000 per book. To date, 300 libraries have signed up and 28 books have been made open access under this model.

The Open Library of the Humanities (OLH) is a journal initiative modelled on PLoS. Here too the business model is based on collective rather than competitive purchasing by libraries.

The megajournals lower publication costs by offering hundreds of articles on a single publishing platform for peer review and article delivery and thus benefit from an economy of scale.

In a universe where 3,000 to 4,000 articles are published each day, megajournals like PLoS and OLH can help researchers keep up with work in their field by providing a single disciplined based location for article discovery. Like PLoS, OLH is betting that the discoverability of an article plays a much larger role than journal reputation in having an article read.

OLH plans to use existing journals in the humanities as part of a transitional to a full megajournal defined as “a high volume academic publication venue that reviews, publishes and then hosts in perpetuity, high-hundreds to potentially thousands of articles per year.”

You can learn more on the OLH website and read Martin Eve’s latest article “All That Glisters: Investigating Collective Funding Mechanisms for Gold Open Access in Humanities Disciplines.”

To hear more about the intricacies of open access publishing and the humanities, today at 4 p.m. we will be hosting a panel discussion with the Associate Dean Research of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, a Dalhousie librarian, and the editor in chief of  McGill Queen’s University Press:

Differing Perspectives on Open Access: a panel discussion
Thursday, October 23/4–5:30 p.m.
Room 224, Student Union Building

We will also be hosting this event on Friday:

Open Access at MIT Press: OA in a large university press
Friday, October 24/1 p.m.
Room 2616, Killam Memorial Library

 

 

Dr. Randall Martin Encourages Researchers to Consider Publishing in Open Access Journals

16x24 oaweek poster 2014

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its eighth year, is an opportunity for the academics and researchers to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research. (from the Open Access Week website)

This week, the Dalhousie Libraries will be doing a blog post a day on different topics related to open access, as well as hosting two events.

Dr. Randall Martin Encourages Researchers to Consider Publishing in Open Access Journals

Dr. Randall Martin is a Killam Professor in the Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science and the Department of Chemistry. This fall, he was named to the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, one of the highest recognitions a Canadian academic can receive.

Dr. Martin has published many articles, and some of his research has appeared in open access journals. Open Access refers to the publication of scholarly research that is free to read and online. Open Access publishing models represent a fundamental shift in the economics of how scholars communicate. The prices libraries pay for scholarly books and journals have steadily increased to the point that libraries can no longer keep up.  The result is that a lot of publicly funded research and writing has become inaccessible to the public and even to the academics and scholars that create this content in the first place. Open Access is an attempt to reverse this trend by changing the business model for scholarly communications. Open Access business models vary but many Open Access journals require the author to pay author processing fees; Dr. Martin pays those fees from his research grants.

Dr. Randall Martin

Dr. Randall Martin

October 20–26 marks the globally recognized Open Access Week, a chance for academics and researchers to continue to learn about the benefits of open access and why this is an important aspect of scholarly communications. In recognition of Open Access Week, we asked Dr. Martin to share his thoughts on his experiences publishing in open access journals.

“I publish in open access journals because they are easily available to a broad audience, increasing the accessibility of our research,” says Dr. Martin. When considering an open access journal to publish in, he looks at the focus area of the journal, the readership, and its reputation.

“For many readers, the discoverability of individual articles is an important factor,” he says. There are somewhere between 2,000 and 4,000 science articles published each day, a staggering number for any reader to get through. “Open access publications are worth serious consideration as a way to increase visibility,” says Dr. Martin.

A selection of articles that Dr. Martin has published in open access journals include:

Croft, B., J. R. Pierce, and R. V. Martin, Interpreting Aerosol Lifetimes Using the GEOS-Chem Radionuclide Model, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 4313-4325, 2014. http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/4313/2014/acp-14-4313-2014.html

van Donkelaar, A., R. V. Martin, M. Brauer, R. Kahn, R. Levy, C. Verduzco, and P. J. Villeneuve, Global estimates of ambient fine particulate matter concentrations from satellite-based aerosol optical depth: Development and application, Environ. Health Perspec., doi:10.1289/ehp.0901623, 2010. http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/0901623/

Sauvage, B., R.V. Martin, A. van Donkelaar, X. Liu, K. Chance, L. Jaegle, P.I. Palmer, S. Wu, and T.-M. Fu, Remote sensed and in situ constraints on processes affecting tropical tropospheric ozone, Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 7, 815-838, 2007.  http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/815/2007/acp-7-815-2007.html

The Dalhousie Libraries will be hosting two events for Open Access Week:

Differing Perspectives on Open Access: a panel discussion
Thursday, October 23/4–5:30 p.m.
Room 224, Student Union Building

Open Access at MIT Press: OA in a large university press
Friday, October 24/1 p.m.
Room 2616, Killam Memorial Library

Dalhousie Researchers and Open Access Publishing

Open Access Week, a global event now entering its eighth year, is an opportunity for the academics and researchers to continue to learn about the potential benefits of open access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make open access a new norm in scholarship and research. (from the Open Access Week website)

This week, the Dalhousie Libraries will be doing a blog post a day on different topics related to open access, as well as hosting two events.

Dalhousie Researchers and Open Access Publishing

Researchers worldwide are actively publishing in open access journals as well as adding their work to various repositories such as arXiv, SSRN, PubMedCentral or DalSpace. One third of the world’s peer-reviewed journals are now fully open access. These 10,000 journals provide access to more than 1.7 million articles.

Dalhousie researchers’ work can be found in many different open access journals. The Web of Science focusses on high-impact journals and of those journals, it indexes a limited number of highly regarded open access journals. Unfortunately, since Web of Science includes only a fraction of the world’s social science and humanities journals, it does not give the full open access picture for those disciplines. Since Web of Science does include many STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) journals, it can offer us a glimpse into Dalhousie researchers’ contributions to open access publishing.

According to the Web of Science database, since 2000 most of the open access work of Dalhousie researchers appears in these journals:

  • PLOS One
  • Canadian Family Physician
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
  • International Journal of Qualitative Methods
  • Journal of the Canadian Dental Association
  • Current Oncology
  • BMC Evolutionary Biology
  • Journal of Psychiatry Neuroscience
  • Nucleic Acids Research
  • Biogeosciences

Growth in the number of open access articles authored by Dalhousie researchers:

OA chart

Some of Dalhousie’s most honoured scientists are regularly publishing in open access journals. They include faculty members from the departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Computer Science Physics and Atmospheric Science, Biology, Computer Science, Family Medicine, Geriatric Medicine Research, and Psychiatry.

Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post which includes an interview with Dr. Randall Martin of the Physics and Atmospheric Science whose work appears in open access journals.

The Dalhousie Libraries will be hosting two events for Open Access Week:

Differing Perspectives on Open Access: a panel discussion
Thursday, October 23/4–5:30 p.m.
Room 224, Student Union Building

Open Access at MIT Press: OA in a large university press
Friday, October 24/1 p.m.
Room 2616, Killam Memorial Library